Getting to know you…

Getting to know you…

Get to the know the staff here at Monroe Town and Country!

Annie

Annie

Annie started working at Monroe Town and Country 3.5 years ago after graduating from The University of Connecticut.

What pets do you currently own?

Concho-19 year old Quarter Horse (in photo)

Gracie- 8 year old Lab Mix

Luke- 4 year old German Shorthaired Pointer

Derek- 1 year old Mixed Breed Rabbit

Addison- 2 month old Flemish Giant Rabbit

Steve- Beta Fish…age unknown 🙂

What’s your favorite thing about working at the hospital?

I like that every day is different and that I’m constantly learning and seeing new things. I also really enjoy my coworkers—human and animal alike!

What do you like to do in your free time?

I love doing anything outside (hiking with my dogs, riding my horse, going to the beach, etc.) no matter what the weather is like. I also love singing and am a worship leader at my church. Other interests include volunteering at the therapeutic riding program at my barn, reading, photography, and spending time with my family (which includes my pets!) and my friends.

What’s your favorite animal memory?

When I was 13, my parents got me my first German Shorthaired Pointer named Dylan. He got his paws on a stuffed animal, ripped the ear off of it and ate it. We called the veterinarian we were taking him to, and they said to just keep an eye on his stool and make sure it passed. A few days later, my mom triumphantly pulled the ear out his stool (with gloves on!) and was waving it in the air. Dylan, a very rambunctious and big puppy, ran over, jumped on my mom, grabbed the ear, and ate it AGAIN. Let’s just say the next time the ear reappeared in his stool we removed it very inconspicuously…we still laugh about it all these years later.

If you could be any animal, what would you like to be?

I would love to be a dolphin—they seem so happy and carefree!

Linse

Linse

Linse started working at Monroe Town and Country 2.5 years ago after graduating from Newtown High School.

What pets do you currently own?

Rufus- 1.5 year old, Mixed Breed Dog (in photo)

Bubba- Goldfish

What’s your favorite thing about working at the hospital?

My coworkers (including BlackJack, Clover, Lindaberg, Louie, and Jack) and that we all have the random need to burst out in song every now and again 🙂

What do you like to do in your free time?

I like to be lazy and also go on hikes/run in the woods on trails when I’m not feeling so lazy. I like to do crafts as well.

What’s your favorite animal memory?

I woke up one morning around 2am to my hair being tugged on. I rolled over and to my surprise, four month old Rufus was playing with my ponytail as a tug-of-war toy. It was too cute and hilarious!

If you could be any animal, what would you like to be?

Wild horse. They’re so carefree and have endless fields to run in…or a humpback whale, they’re so majestic.

Vanessa

Vanessa

Vanessa started working at Monroe Town and Country 2 years ago after graduating from Joel Barlow High School.

What pets do you currently own?

Tess- 10 year old Mixed Breed Dog (in photo)

Sophie- 2 year old Domestic Shorthaired Cat

Hank- 7 year old Domestic Shorthaired Cat

Queenie- 2 year old Lop Eared Rabbit

What’s your favorite thing about working at the hospital?

Taking care of the rescue animals that come in and giving them makeovers!

What do you like to do in your free time?

I like spending time with my family—both humans and animals. Also going on hikes and hula hooping!

What’s your favorite animal memory?

My favorite animal memory would have to be the day I decided that I wanted to adopt a 9 year old Pit Bull with osteosarcoma from the SPCA. I came into work the day after her leg amputation. She jumped up as soon as I opened the cage, we walked outside, and when I knelt down to pet her, she immediately began to lick my face. That’s when I knew that I couldn’t let her go back to the shelter. Adopting Layla was one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done.

If you could be any animal, what would you like to be?

I would be an elephant because they travel with their families and are so loyal to one another. It’s amazing how females will take in orphaned babies and treat them as their own. They really are beautiful animals.

Maggie

Maggie

Maggie started working at Monroe Town and Country 2 years ago while attending Trumbull High School Agriscience Program and recently graduated.

What pets do you currently own?

Jax- 6 year old Maine Coon Mix (in photo)

Minnie- 2 year old Munchkin Cat

Holly- 12 year old Cocker Spaniel (our Christmas baby)

Dixie- 9 year old Chow Mix (our Foster dog)

What’s your favorite thing about working at the hospital?

I love making new friends, both two and four legged! Meeting new or our regular clients always brings a smile to my face! I have the world’s best coworkers that always make me laugh! It’s never a dull day at MTC!!

What do you like to do in your free time?

When I’m home I’m usually reading, watching a movie, or snuggling with my cat, Minnie. However, I love traveling and experiencing new things! I also love quading, dirt biking, skiing/snowboarding, horseback riding, and my favorite this season…snowmobiling!

What’s your favorite animal memory?

My favorite animal memory…well that’s a tough one. It would have to be one time when I was walking our furry friends that were staying with us at the hospital. It had been a long day, and I wasn’t in a good mood. So, I was walking a Mastiff (wonderfully named, Maggie) while we were in the back yard and I sat on a tree stump as I let her do her business. She then turned around, saw me sitting down, and walked up to me. She put her two front paws on my lap and gave me a big kiss! A 125lb dog attempting to be a lap dog was just about the cutest and sweetest surprise! It just reminds me that no matter how big or small the animal, they will always have a big heart, and can always brighten my day.

If you could be any animal, what would you like to be?

I think I’d like to be a cat. They’re so smart, quick, and agile unlike me! Not to mention they can easily fall asleep anywhere—I wouldn’t mind being in bed all day!

Bre

Bre

Bre started working at Monroe Town and Country 1 year ago and is currently attending Masuk High School.

What pets do you currently own?

Hannah- 2 year old Yellow Lab (in photo)

Carly- 11 year old Yellow Lab (in photo)

Riley- 7 year old Guinea Pig

Pickles- 1 year old Hamster

What’s your favorite thing about working at the hospital?

I love that each day is spent helping animals and that you never know what each day will hold. Watching a once sick animal go home happy and healthy is the greatest reward.

What do you like to do in your free time?

I love to take my dogs Hannah and Carly for hikes in the woods.

What’s your favorite animal memory?

My favorite animal memory is the day I got my first dog. After years of begging, nothing could top holding my Lab puppy for the first time.

If you could be any animal, what would you like to be?

If I could be any animal I would want to be any type of bird. Flying sounds fantastic.

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Fleas and Ticks

Tales from the Office Kitty

Hello everyone! This is BlackJack writing once again with a friendly reminder that flea and tick preventatives are still necessary at this time of year. Many people believe that because it’s getting chilly at night, preventatives are no longer needed. But, man, have we seen a ton of flea and tick cases in the last month! The chilly nights and warmer days are the extra motivation fleas and ticks need to find a nice dog or cat to feed on during the day, as well as a warm body to stay on at night—I know I certainly don’t want to be the host for that kind of slumber party!

Now for a few fun facts about fleas and ticks that I have learned during my stay at the hospital:

Fleas:

-Once fleas find a host (that is, an animal that can provide a blood meal like a dog or a cat), they will stay there until they die.

-Fleas start laying eggs almost immediately after feeding on their host and can continue to lay eggs indefinitely. The eggs then fall off when the host moves and hatch in the environment.

-Fleas don’t like cold temperatures so they are always on the lookout for a warm body.

-Fleas can transmit tapeworm and bartonellosis.

 

Ticks:

-Ticks feed on their host and then detach and live in tall grasses, leaves, etc until they are ready for their next meal (and host!).

-Female ticks can lay up to 1000 eggs…but can only do so once, then they die.

-Ticks can live in nearly freezing temperatures. They are much hardier than fleas and therefore harder to kill!

-Ticks can transmit diseases such as Lyme disease, Ehrlichia, and Anaplasmosis

As you can probably imagine, dogs and cats (like me!) certainly don’t want to become the next host for either of these parasites! Aside from the disconcerting thought of becoming a meal, I’d rather not get any of the diseases I mentioned above. Until there is a hard frost (where the ground stays frozen), it is important to keep your pet protected from fleas and ticks. Also remember, as soon as there is a thaw, the fleas and ticks are right back at it!

If you do find that your pet has fleas, the staff here at the hospital can get you set up with everything you need to eradicate them from your home and pet. They’ve got it all! Because flea eggs fall off their host and into their surrounding environment, it is important to treat not only the animal but your home as well.

If you find that your dog has ticks, please give the office a call as Dr. Basak-Smith often prescribes a week’s worth of antibiotics prophylactically to ward off the development of any tick borne illnesses. Us cats don’t tend to get tick borne diseases but don’t forget, we can bring ticks inside to our humans (sorry!) who can contract these diseases so it’s still important to keep them off of us! Topical tick medications do a great job of keeping ticks of us.

I bet you didn’t think a cat would know so much about fleas and ticks, did you? But I see it all and I do my best on keeping my humans in the know. Like I’ve said before, it’s a tough life, but someone’s got to live it.

 

Until Next Time,

 

BlackJack

Body Language

Your dog may not speak English but there are plenty of ways he or she can communicate with you. Here at the office we rely on a dog’s body language to tell us important information: Are they painful? Are they nervous? Are they happy? There are many ways to know what a dog is thinking based on their mannerisms. Here are a few of the common emotions of dogs and the way they express them:

Relaxed/Calm

Tail down and relaxed

Ears up but not forward

Mouth open slightly

Head high

Alert

Tail horizontal

Ears up and forward

Mouth closed

Head high

Eyes wide

Dominant/Aggressive

Tail raised

Ears forward

Lips curled

Teeth often visible

Hackles raised

Fearful/Aggressive

Tail tucked

Ears back

Body lowered, hackles raised

Lips slightly curled

Pupils dilated

Stressed/Distressed

Tail down

Ears back

Body lowered

Rapid panting

Pupils dilated

Fearful/Worried

Tail down (may wag slightly)

Ears back

Body lowered

Often licks the air

Eye contact brief

Fearful/Submission

Tail tucked

Ears back

Roll onto back

May urinate

Eyes closed slightly

Playful

Tail up

Ears up

Mouth open, tongue exposed

Front end lowered with rear end raised

Excited

Tail wagging quickly

Ears forward

Often paws the air

Mouth open

 

 

luke3

Here is Annie’s dog, Luke, showing his unique body language characteristic…biting his lip in concentration!

 

In the past few weeks there has been a recurring theme over here in the office: cruciate tears.

What is a cruciate? 

The cruciate ligament (also know the ACL) is a major component in dog and cat knees. The knee is comprised of the patella (knee cap), cartilage called the meniscus, and a series of ligaments connecting the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (shin bone). Together these components enable joint function. The joint then has two stabilizing ligaments which cross over the joint which are called the cruciate ligaments.

How does this happen?

Unfortunately cruciate tears can happen in even the healthiest and most athletic pets. There are certain factors that may make some pets more likely than others, such as being overweight or having patellar luxation. Some breeds are also more prone to these injuries such as rottweilers and cocker spaniels. While it is a much more common occurrence in dogs, cruciate tears can also happen in cats. The most common cause of cruciate tears, however, is a sudden trauma. This trauma can be caused by any movement that puts excessive pressure on the knee such as stepping in a hole while running, twisting while the foot remains planted, landing wrong when jumping or general rough play.

How do I know if my pet has torn his cruciate?

The most common symptom is acute, sudden lameness in a hind leg. Your pet will most likely be non-weight bearing on the injured leg. If you suspect your pet may have a cruciate injury, please schedule an appointment for the doctor to assess your pet. Although xrays are sometimes required, this injury can often be diagnosed through palpation of the joint.

My pet’s cruciate is torn, now what?

Depending on the severity of the tear there are various levels of treatment including exercise restriction and anti-inflammatories. In the case of complete tears (sometimes tears are only partial), surgery is required to stabilize the joint. The good news is, most pets make a full recovery and are back to running around in no time!

dogs

 

Monroe Town and Country Veterinary Hospital

607 Main Street, Monroe, CT 06468

203.268.8681 (p)

203.445.1510 (f)

mtcveterinary@yahoo.com

Tales from the Office Kitty: Household Dangers

Hi. Let me introduce myself. My name is BlackJack and for the past year or so I’ve been living at Monroe Town and Country doing a very important job: overseeing the daily operations of the hospital and making sure everyone is doing what they’re supposed to be doing. It’s a tough life, but someone’s got to live it. 

Image

One of my favorite things about my job is that I get to see many interesting cases. Lately it seems like a lot of pets are getting their noses into things they shouldn’t. Watching patients vomiting, having diarrhea, getting intravenous fluids, and sometimes even having surgery over these past few weeks has certainly made me reconsider eating things I’m not supposed to! Sadly, not everyone is as lucky as I am to witness these things first hand, so I’m writing to tell you about the dangers that may be lurking in your home.

  • Chocolate: Even though it may be one of man’s best friends, chocolate doesn’t sit well with dogs and cats. The good news is, if you love chocolate as much as the humans who work at the hospital do, you won’t mind not sharing with your pet.
  • Rodentcides/Pesticides: It seems dogs especially love getting their paws on these items, so please, keep them out of reach!
  • Plants: Many plants such as lillies and pointsettias are toxic to your pets! They sure are pretty, but please keep them away from your dogs and cats. Cats in particular like to snack on plants (I know I do!) so be mindful of where you display your greenery. 
  • Drugs: Even though people can safely take many prescription and over-the-counter drugs, not all of them are suitable for pets. Ibuprofen (advil/motrin), acetaminophen (tylenol), and anti-depressants are just a few of the common culprits for adverse drug reactions in dogs and cats.
  • Grapes/Raisins, Avocados, Onions: I bet you didn’t know these are bad for dogs and cats! As delicious as they seem to be for people, they don’t agree with your pets.
  • Bones: Yikes! I’ve had to watch a few surgeries with animals getting bone pieces removed from their intestines. As much fun as it is for your pet to strip all the meat off of bones, it turns out they can do more harm than good.
  • String: Everyone knows cats love string so this one is hard for me talk about. But the sad truth is, string can get tangled and knotted in an animal’s stomach which requires surgical removal. It’d be better for everyone if you don’t allow your pet to play with string, no matter how much they seem to enjoy it!

These are just a few of the every day household items that may cause harm to your pet. If you ever have any questions about something your pet ate (or even if you think your pet may have eaten it), please feel free to give the office a call. Now if you’ll excuse me, there are things that need overseeing.

Until Next Time,

BlackJack 

 

 

 

Monroe Town and Country Veterinary Hospital

607 Main Street, Monroe, CT 06468

203.268.8681 (p)

203.445.1510 (f)

mtcveterinary@yahoo.com